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Lake Trasimeno in Italy. Photo credit: Riccardo Biondi

A change of latitude for a new spring in your step?

05-Feb-15

Last updated: 16-Nov-16

By Elsa Trujillo

At RunUltra we have a wide choice of different Winter Ultras according to your latitude or how far you are willing to travel to get warmer. These are some of the ultra running events you can find on our worldwide map:

Run north of the Tropic of Cancer (23°N)

In Europe you can run at different latitudes: the Thames Trot and the Moonlight Challenge in February or the New Forest Running Festival in March (54°N) or you can head further south to the Italian Strasimeno (43°N) or the Spanish Ultra Trail Sierra del Bandolero (40°N) both in March.

In America you can run in warmer Winter Ultras if you sign up for the Lake Martin 100 (32°N) or the Mississippi 50 Trail Run (31°N) in March. Of course, if you want real winter just head north towards the Arctic Circle (66°N) and run the Yukon Arctic Ultra (60°N) in Canada.

Run closer to the Equator (0°)

Move closer to the earth’s middle for the January Ultra India Race (10°N) or get busy in Costa Rica: The Coastal Challenge (9°N) is followed closely by the Ultra Trail Arenal Volcano (9°N) in February and the Trail Marathon Irazu Volcano (9°N) in March. Further south, run The Wild Elephant Trail in Sri Lanka (7°N) also in March.

Of course, this is all topsy-turvy if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere where you can run The Hillary (36°S) at the very end of March and say goodbye to the hot weather and hello to cooler days.

If you’ve run these races (or if you’re about to) please tell us when, why, and most importantly, how did you do! Help other runners make up their minds, just click on each race listing, log in or register as a member and write about your experience.

Need the cold? Head towards the Arctic Circle. Photo credit: Robert Pollhammer

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